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REPORT: Advanced Energy Industry Employs 143,000 workers in Texas, With Employment Expected to Increase 7 Percent This Year

May 10, 2016
Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

Accounting for more than 1 percent of the state workforce, advanced energy supports more jobs in Texas than chemical manufacturing and petroleum refining, twice as many as airlines

Austin, Texas – May 10, 2016 – Employment in Texas’s advanced energy industry stands at an estimated 143,023 workers. That’s more people than are employed in chemical manufacturing and petroleum refining, twice as many as employed by airlines, and nearly as many working in building construction in the Lone Star State. Employers engaged in advanced energy business expect to increase their workforce by 7 percent this year, which would bring Texas’s advanced energy industry to over 152,000 jobs.

These are some of the findings of Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas, a new report released today by the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance (TAEBA).

 

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“Advanced energy is a large and growing industry in Texas, and it’s paying off in real jobs for Texans,” said Suzanne Bertin, Executive Director of Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance (TAEBA), a business association of advanced energy companies in Texas. “The reliability and cost benefits of advanced energy technologies are driving growth in the industry, and employers expect to add jobs in the coming year. That’s good news for our companies and for the Texas economy.”

A new Energy Employment Index, produced by BW Research Partnership, makes it possible to quantify jobs in the advanced energy industry for the first time. The Index is based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and a detailed survey of more than 20,000 businesses nationwide conducted between September and November of 2015. The Index is the basis for the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s first annual U.S. Energy and Employment Report, which was published in March.

For TAEBA, BW Research Partnership was able to draw on the Index, which covers employment in the entire energy industry, to quantify the jobs directly associated with advanced energy in the state of Texas. 

In this report, advanced energy employees are defined as full-time and part-time permanent employees of businesses that are engaged in making or deploying advanced energy products and services for all or a portion of their revenue, and who themselves support the advanced energy portion of these businesses.

Advanced energy workers are those who spend some or all of their time on advanced energy work such as energy efficiency, advanced electricity generation (including wind, solar, and natural gas), biofuels, advanced grid technology, and advanced vehicles.

The report also illustrates the variety of jobs with eight profiles of Texas advanced energy workers.

“Working in the solar industry was the number-one draw for me,” said Robyn Kenkel of Sunnova Energy Corp. in Houston, one of the workers profiled. “It’s rare that you have an opportunity to be part of something so innovative and transformational.”

The TAEBA jobs report follows Advanced Energy in Texas, published last year, a market report that found advanced energy represented a $16 billion industry in Texas.

Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas is available at http://www.texasadvancedenergy.org/ 

Findings of Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas 2016, prepared by BW Research Partnership, include: 

EMPLOYEES

  • Advanced energy employed an estimated 143,023 Texans in 2015.
  • Workers engaged in advanced energy make up 1 percent of the state workforce overall.
  • Employers surveyed expect to add an estimated 9,334 new jobs this year, an increase of almost 7 percent, which would bring advanced energy employment to over 152,000.
  • The largest share of advanced energy jobs is in energy efficiency – 51 percent, or about 73,000 workers.
  • At nearly 39,000 workers, employment in Texas advanced electricity generation, makes up 27 percent of the advanced energy workforce.
    • Wind accounts for about 44 percent of these jobs, solar 28 percent, and advanced natural gas 16 percent.
  • Texas is also home to a significant advanced fuels industry, with an estimated 9,500 workers in total, the majority of whom work on corn ethanol.
  • Advanced Transportation employs 19,000 workers (13 percent of total advanced energy employment) who spend some or all of their time on hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and natural gas vehicles.
  • Texas’s advanced energy workforce is predominantly male (78 percent); 43 percent of advanced energy workers in Texas are racial or ethnic minorities, with the share of last year’s hires significantly higher (53 percent).
  • One in 10 advanced energy workers in Texas are Veterans. 

EMPLOYERS

  • Texas has nearly 15,000 companies engaged in advanced energy as part or all of their business activity.
  • Texas advanced energy industry is primarily composed of small businesses. Three-quarters of advanced energy businesses employ 24 permanent employees or less. But Texas has a sizeable share of medium-sized firms as well – 15 percent of advanced energy businesses employ between 25 and 249 workers, indicating the advanced energy economy is mature enough to support larger firms.

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About the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

The Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance includes local and national advanced energy companies seeking to make Texas’s energy system secure, clean, reliable, and affordable. TAEBA’s mission is to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the opportunity offered by all forms of advanced energy for cost savings, electric system reliability and resiliency, and economic growth in the state of Texas. For more information, visit texasadvancedenergy.org.

Media Contacts

Monique Hanis, monique.hanis@texasadvancedenergy.org, 202-391-0884

Susan DeVico, susandv@aol.com, 510-339-1527

 


 

Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance Appoints Suzanne Bertin as Executive Director

February 4, 2016
Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

Industry group seeks to grow $16 billion market in state

Austin, Texas – Feb. 4, 2016 – Today, the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance (TAEBA) announced the appointment of Suzanne Bertin, a seasoned Texas energy business and regulatory expert, to lead the business group as its Executive Director. TAEBA members include local and national companies that represent the vibrant and growing advanced energy industry in Texas.

According to an analysis by Navigant Research published last March, Texas advanced energy revenue reached $16 billion in 2014, representing 8 percent of the total U.S. market for advanced energy technologies and products – enough to buy the Dallas Cowboys, the NFL’s most valuable franchise, five times over.

"The Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance is lucky to have found Suzanne Bertin to lead a broad range of stakeholders that see great opportunity for industry growth and impact in our state," said John Ashe, Director, CLEAResult, a leader in designing and implementing technology-enabled energy efficiency programs for utilities, headquartered in Austin. "Texas has the pro-business, pro-growth spirit to make the most of this opportunity to lead in energy innovation, service options and savings for energy clients in Texas and beyond."

"We are thrilled to have Suzanne Bertin leading our efforts to build a strong industry presence in Texas," said Todd Horsman, Vice President, Regulatory and Delivery for Landis + Gyr, a global leader in energy management solutions, including electricity metering and smart grid services. "New technologies and business models are fundamentally changing the way we make, manage, and use energy - we could not have found a better leader to ensure Texas gets its fair share of this high-growth market, along with the investment and jobs that come with it."


"The Texas solar market is booming and, with Suzanne Bertin on board, TAEBA is positioned to help us accelerate this growth, along with all advanced energy technologies," said Colin Meehan, Director, Regulatory & Public Affairs, First Solar (NASDAQ: FSLR), the largest U.S. based manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) panels, with several major projects in Texas. "As our member companies grow, so does the Texas economy, creating jobs and contributing toward prosperity for all Texans."

“I’m thrilled to support the growing advanced energy industry in Texas,” said Bertin. “Texas has enviable resources and the opportunity to expand and diversify our energy market, creating jobs and economic growth, while improving reliability and resiliency of our energy infrastructure. TAEBA is made up of great companies that can make this happen.”

Prior to joining TAEBA, Bertin handled regulatory and government affairs in Texas and the Southeast for EnerNOC, a leading provider of cloud-based energy intelligence software and services to thousands of enterprise customers and utilities globally. In that role, she was an active member of TAEBA and worked with other companies to launch the organization. Before EnerNOC, Bertin was at Reliant (NRG) for more than a decade, where she worked on a wide range of wholesale and retail legislative and regulatory issues, from the inception of the competitive retail market in ERCOT. In these roles, she had direct business and policy experience relating to advanced energy technologies including energy efficiency, demand response, natural gas, solar, wind, electric vehicles, and smart grid. 

Bertin worked in the Office of Policy Development at the Public Utility Commission of Texas during the late 1990s, when the ERCOT competitive retail market was established by Texas Senate Bill 7. Suzanne co-led the team responsible for implementing the transition to competition, which encompassed more than 40 regulatory proceedings, many of which were highly complex and contentious. She previously held electrical engineering positions at Austin Energy and at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.   

Bertin earned her Master of Public Affairs degree from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. She also holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and a Bachelor of Arts (Managerial Studies), both from Rice University in Houston, Texas. Bertin is a lifelong Texan and resides in Austin.

About the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

The Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance includes local and national advanced energy companies seeking to make Texas’s energy system secure, clean, reliable, and affordable. TAEBA’s mission is to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the opportunity offered by all forms of advanced energy for cost savings, electric system reliability and resiliency, and economic growth in the state of Texas. For more information, visit texasadvancedenergy.org.

Media Contact

Monique Hanis, monique.hanis@texasadvancedenergy.org, 202-391-0884

 


 

Report: Texas’s Advanced Energy Market Estimated at $16B in Revenue – Enough to Buy Dallas Cowboys Five Times Over

March 11, 2015
Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

At $5.5B, Building Efficiency is Largest Market Segment; Wind, Natural Gas, other Electricity Generation Technologies Next Largest at $3.6B

Austin, TX, March 11, 2015 – The advanced energy industry is a powerful economic driver in Texas, with an estimated $16 billion in 2014 revenue, according to the first comprehensive analysis of the advanced energy market in the state. Representing 8 percent of the total U.S. market for advanced energy technologies and products, Texas advanced energy revenue of $16 billion would be enough to buy the Dallas Cowboys, the NFL’s most valuable franchise, five times over.

The report, Advanced Energy in Texas, is available for download at texasadvancedenergy.org.

Advanced Energy in Texas was commissioned by the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance (TAEBA), a new group on the Texas scene. TAEBA is made up of local and national advanced energy companies doing business in Texas and helping the Lone Star State meet its energy challenges. A complete list of companies participating in TAEBA is available at texasadvancedenergy.org.

Though well known as the center of the traditional oil and gas industry, Texas is also home to a growing advanced energy industry in areas such as wind and solar energy, natural gas electricity generation, and energy efficiency measures that save money for building owners and manufacturers. 

The report gives much of the credit for advanced energy growth in Texas to the state’s pro-business, pro-growth spirit combined with deliberate policy structures, including renewable energy and energy efficiency standards, as well as the nation’s most open and competitive market for energy resources, managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

Advanced energy is defined as a broad category of technologies and products, and it is made up of seven major segments. In Texas, building efficiency is the largest segment, with $5.4 billion in revenue in 2014. Products and services such as building efficiency improvements, efficient lighting, high efficiency HVAC equipment, and demand response are significant contributors to this segment of the industry. The second largest segment, at $3.6 billion in 2014, is made up of advanced electricity generation technologies such as wind, solar, and natural gas.

Other findings include:

  • Electricity Generation: With $3.6 billion in revenue, electricity generation (such as wind, natural gas, solar, geothermal, biomass, etc.) is the second leading advanced energy segment in the state.
  • Fuel Production: Advanced fuels, including compressed and liquefied natural gas for vehicles, make up Texas’s third largest advanced energy segment, with $2.7B in revenue.
  • Natural gas vehicles, hybrid vehicles, and the fueling infrastructure that supports them contributed to $2.3 billion in advanced Transportation revenue in Texas.
  • Wind: Texas has more than 14 GW of wind power – twice the capacity of California – with an additional 10 GW of wind in the pipeline.
  • Natural Gas: With nearly 70 GW of capacity currently, Texas natural gas power generation is projected to fulfill over 4.5 GW of growth over the next two to three years.
  • Energy Storage: With potential to end a range of electricity system problems and inefficiencies – fluctuating demand, idle capacity, variable resources, minute-to-minute frequency control – and steep cost reductions anticipated, energy storage is now within reach.

“Advanced energy is alive and well in Texas,” said Susan Reilly, president of Renewable Energy Systems Americas, Inc. (RES Americas), and current chair of the American Wind Energy Association. RES Americas and its many Texas projects are profiled in the report. “Texas is the nation’s leader in wind energy, today and going forward – just look at what’s in the pipeline. RES Americas is proud of the wind and solar installations we’ve worked on in Texas and we look forward to many more in the future.”

“Solar is taking off in Texas,” said Jim Hughes, CEO of First Solar, a global provider of photovoltaic solar energy solutions. “Our Barilla Solar project is the first solar power plant in the country to offer electricity on an open contract basis, and it illustrates how solar has become a reliable, competitively priced component in the state’s balanced energy portfolio. We see an enormous growth opportunity for solar in Texas.” Along with the Barilla power plant, First Solar has several other projects in various stages of development in Texas.

“CLEAResult is tapped into Texas’ energy market—not only because we’re headquartered in Austin—because we’ve run close to 20,000 projects across the state since 2006 that have delivered significant energy and incentive impacts. The appetite for energy efficiency is here,” said Michele Negley, vice president of the south region for CLEAResult, an energy efficiency consulting firm. (A CLEAResult employee was interviewed for the report.) “Energy efficiency is a powerful tool for economic growth and diversification of resources. Our research as well as TAEBA’s report, indicate there is great potential to help utilities, businesses and individual Texans save money and improve comfort by making the wise use of energy a way of life.”

About the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance

The Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance includes local and national advanced energy companies seeking to make Texas’s energy system more secure, clean, reliable and affordable. TAEBA’s mission is to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the opportunity offered by all forms of advanced energy for cost savings, electric system reliability and resiliency, and economic growth in the state of Texas. For more information, visit texasadvancedenergy.org.

About Navigant Research

Navigant Research, a part of Navigant Consulting’s Energy Practice, is a market research and advisory group that provides in-depth analysis of global clean technology markets with a specific focus on the commercialization and market growth opportunities for emerging energy technologies. Navigant is focused across four research programs: Energy Technologies, Utility Transformations, Transportation Efficiencies, and Building Innovations. For more information, visit navigantresearch.com.

 


 

TAEBA’s Bertin quoted in S&P Platts: “Texas utility rate proposal draws fire, praise”

August 10, 2016
Mark Watson | S&P Platts

In an article for S&P Platts, Mark Watson quoted TAEBA Executive Director Suzanne Bertin discussing a utility rate change. Watson writes:

Another witness who spoke against the SFV rate mechanism was Suzanne Bertin, executive director of the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance, a group of companies involved in energy efficiency, energy storage, demand response, distributed energy resources, natural gas generation, biofuels, nuclear power and smart grid sectors. 

"Straight fixed-variable can allow utilities to recover costs either through fixed monthly charges or peak demand charges, and a major down side of substantially increasing those fixed charges is that it creates a disincentive for customers to invest in distributed energy resources by taking away their opportunity to make their personal decisions about how and when to consume energy," Burton said. "SFV would send the wrong price signal to customers by reducing the incentive to manage their own bills and reduce their own usage."

Read the full article here (subscription required).

 


 

TAEBA in San Antonio Business Journal: ‘Advanced energy’ jobs outnumber refining

May 20, 2016
Sergio Chapa | San Antonio Business Journal

The San Antonio Business Journal featured TAEBA’s report, “Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas 2016” in an article that detailed the scope of the advanced energy economy in Texas. Chapa writes:

The Lone Star State is the center of the nation’s oil and gas industry, but the solar, wind and energy-efficiency sectors appear to be on track to one day eclipse the fossil-fuel industry. 

It’s no secret that low commodity prices have resulted in thousands of layoffs across the oil and gas industry, which at last count employed around 245,000 people in Texas. But a new report from the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance shows that “advanced energy” jobs have grown to the point where they now employ more people than refining and chemical manufacturing in the Lone Star State.

Read the full story here.

 


 

CleanTechnica: “143,000 Workers In Texas Advanced Energy Industry”

May 17, 2016
Jake Richardson | CleanTechnica

CleanTechnica covers TAEBA’s latest report, “Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas.” Richardson writes:

At the growth rate of 7% mentioned above, about 9,334 new advanced energy jobs would be added to the Texas economy this year. About half of the 143,000 work in energy efficiency. Almost 39,000 work in the advanced electricity production field, which includes wind and solar power. Of the nearly 39,000, about 44% work in wind power, which is not so surprising considering that Texas is a wind power leader in the US. There are also about 9,500 workers who are employed in the corn ethanol field.

19,000 are employed in advanced transportation, so they spend all or part of their time working on hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and natural gas vehicles.

Read the full story here.

 


 

Energywire: “Advanced energy group touts jobs”

May 10, 2016
Edward Klump and Pamela King | E&E Reporters

Energywire covers TAEBA’s latest report, Advanced Energy Jobs in Texas. Klump and King write:

The report, formally released today by the Texas Advanced Energy Business Alliance (TAEBA), tallied around 143,000 positions in advanced energy in the state last year. That easily topped a 100,000 figure from the chemical and refining segment, more than doubled the estimated 60,000 jobs in airlines, and trailed building construction by about 12,000 jobs.

And more expansion may be on the way, according to the report prepared by the BW Research Partnership. It highlighted an estimated addition of 9,334 Texas advanced energy jobs by the end of this year to surpass 152,000, marking potential growth of close to 7 percent.

"The main takeaway of the report is simply that we are a significant presence in the state of Texas and we're growing," Suzanne Bertin, TAEBA's executive director, said in an interview.

Read the full article here (subscription required).

 


 

 “Texas Advanced Energy Jobs” Coverage Round-Up

May 10, 2016
Various

Today TAEBA released a report on employment in Texas’s advanced energy industry, which stands at an estimated 143,023 workers. That’s more people than are employed in chemical manufacturing and petroleum refining, twice as many as employed by airlines, and nearly as many working in building construction in the Lone Star State. Several news outlets covered the report. Click on any below to be taken to the full text of the story (some sources require subscriptions): 

Solar Server: “Advanced Energy Industry Employs 143,000 Workers in Texas, with Employment Expected to Increase 7% This Year

 


 

Austin Business Journal, Energy Wire, and Texas Energy Report Profile TAEBA’s New Executive Director

February 4, 2016
Various

Austin Business Journal profiled TAEBA’s new Executive Director Suzanne Bertin, noting her Texas roots and extensive energy background. The Journal quotes Bertin:  

“Texas has enviable resources and the opportunity to expand and diversify our energy market, creating jobs and economic growth, while improving reliability and resiliency of our energy infrastructure,” Bertin said in a statement. “TAEBA is made up of great companies that can make this happen.”

Polly Ross Hughes, writing for Texas Energy Report, notes that TAEBA covers an emerging $16 billion market and quotes an official from an advanced energy company:

“We are thrilled to have Suzanne Bertin leading our efforts to build a strong industry presence in Texas,” said Todd Horsman, vice president of regulatory and delivery for Landis + Gyr, specializing in energy management solutions such as smart grid services. “New technologies and business models are fundamentally changing the way we make, manage and use energy. We could not have found a better leader to ensure Texas gets its fair share of this high-growth market, along with the investment and jobs that come with it.”

Edward Klump, covering Bertin’s appointment for Energywire, profiles her energy background, in addition to her status as a lifelong Texan. Klump writes:

TAEBA said her experiences have touched on issues related to demand response, energy efficiency, natural gas, renewable energy, electric vehicles and smart grids.